Students Create Opposing Viewpoints Project in Art Class

 

 Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 3.35.26 PMScreen Shot 2016-05-09 at 3.35.06 PM

 

 

 

Opposing viewpoints project: A heavily research based project, where students choose controversial topics and then turn their research into a propaganda sculpture. Their objective is to sway or reconfirm the views and beliefs of anyone who encounters their sculpture.

The opposing viewpoints website provides numerous topics and categories to choose from, allows access to credible sources from all sides of the topic, and neatly compiles it into a single database. With the removal of any bias, students are able to form their own decisions when researching these topics.

Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 3.35.36 PM

Since this project is all about spreading knowledge, students also give short presentations to the class using “keynote” or “prezi” on the topic of their choosing and follow it up by give a short quiz utilizing “Kahoot” an online quiz generator, that everyone can access through their laptops or phones.

Post production of the projects, students also have an opportunity to gain some bonus points by using aurasma. Aurasma allows them to embed more information, animation, or their presentation back into their sculpture. Simply by scanning the sculpture the viewer can gain additional information about the topic, symbolism, or source material that was used in developing each art piece.

This is just one of many projects in which technology is woven into the materials to enhance the student’s overall experience and to allow for maximum individualization of each lesson and art piece.

Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 3.41.59 PM

Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 3.42.19 PM

Submitted by Aaron Yetter, Art Teacher at SHS, May 8, 2016

FBLA at SHS Has a Successful Year

 

        

Future Business Leaders of America is a nonprofit educational association for middle school, high school, and collegiate students who are interested in learning more about the free enterprise system.  FBLA is a nationally recognized club in the United States of America.  Students not only compete among the best in the United States but also students from Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Bermuda and the Dodd’s school in Europe.

The purpose of FBLA is to prepare members for careers in business and to assist them by becoming better employees and citizens. FBLA helps students develop leadership abilities, prepares them for entry into a business-related occupations, and offers a setting where members compete at regional, state and national levels in business and technology curriculum. 

Salisbury FBLA

Salisbury FBLA had another great year. Our FBLA team was comprised of 31 students. All team members successfully placed in the top 6 for their competitive events in our regional competition.  Additionally, 17 of those students qualified for state level competition (I believe it’s the most ever for Salisbury).  Team members traveled to Hershey to compete along side 3,500 other qualifying students from around the state.  Unfortunately, we were unable to place in the top 10 for our competitive events.  The kids were a little upset about it, but were happy to have made it this far. 

I am so proud of our kids, 55% of the club qualified for the state competition. That is so awesome, and it just speaks volumes of the work our teachers are doing in the classroom. I am proud to be a part of Salisbury and the work we do both in and out of school.  

                    Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 3.26.13 PM                                                                Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 3.26.23 PM

Submitted by Mr. Gregg Laub, Teacher at SHS, May 6, 2016

SMS • SHS Joint World Languages Fair 2016

 

 

April 20th marked the 4th annual World Languages Fair at SMS. The language students and clubs joined together in creating a glimpse at study of world languages in Salisbury, the cultures of native speaking countries, the influence of these cultures here in the USA, and the impact having a second language can make on your future. All this was presented to perspective language students currently in 7th grade at SMS in a “fair” format. Seventh grade students and staff circulated among displays created by current German and Spanish students in grades 8 through 12.
Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 1.11.32 PMScreen Shot 2016-05-09 at 1.11.45 PM

Each student completed a “passport” collecting stamps and stickers as they traveled through the exhibits. Students who completed their passports were entered into a raffle for one of 3 $10 iTunes cards.

        Back in their classes, students were provided links to further explore culture and language via online games and videos. After the events of the afternoon, 7th grade students took home the information they gathered at the fair and a letter to parents to open a discussion and choose the language                                                                                                                                            that will best fit his/her career goals.

Submitted by: Karen McGuiness, German Teacher SMS

Cinco de Mayo at SMS

Spanish students at Salisbury Middle School enjoyed their 4th Annual Cinco de Mayo Celebration on May 5th.  Students prepared and shared several different types of Hispanic foods with their classmates.  Mexican music played while students tasted some new foods and shared their own dish.  Prior to the celebration, student learned that Cinco de Mayo is when the Mexicans defeated the French in the Battle of Puebla, and that it is not Mexico’s Independence Day.  

 IMG_2314 copy IMG_2335 #4                                    #1          #5

Submitted by Eden Alden, Spanish Teacher at SMS, May 8, 2016

Quicktime Poetry in Mrs. Schneider’s English 9 Class

Students in Mrs. Schneider’s 9th grade English class are currently exploring a variety of American poets during Poetry Month.  Students are researching poets, reading selected poetry, and writing in their style while they investigate answers to the following questions: what is poetry? how do author’s choices create meaning?

Students are creating websites archiving their favorite poets and their own original poetry, artwork, and photography.  The project will culminate in a Quicktime screencast tour of their website where they answer the question (what is poetry) and reflect on how THEIR choices create meaning.  As an extension activity, students will have the opportunity to animate their original poetry using a digital storytelling tool.

                                                                                 Screen Shot 2016-04-19 at 7.25.44 AM

Submitted by Mrs. Schneider, SHS English Teacher, April 22, 2016

SMS • SHS Joint World Languages Fair 2016

April 2016

April 20th marked the 4th annual World Languages Fair at SMS. The language students and clubs joined together in creating a glimpse at study of world languages in Salisbury, the cultures of native speaking countries, the influence of these cultures here in the USA, and the impact having a second language can make on your future. All this was presented to perspective language students currently in 7th grade at SMS in a “fair” format. Seventh grade students and staff circulated among displays created by current German and Spanish students in grades 8 through 12.

WL1       WL3       WL2

Each student completed a “passport” collecting stamps and stickers as they traveled through the exhibits. Students who completed their passports were entered into a raffle for one of 3 $10 iTunes cards.

        Back in their classes, students were provided links to further explore culture and language via online games and videos. After the events of the afternoon, 7th grade students took home the information they gathered at the fair and a letter to parents to open a discussion and choose the language that will best fit his/her career goals.

Submitted by Karen McGuiness, SMS German Teacher, April 22, 2016

Accidental Animation: Using Keynote to Enhance Digital Storytelling

 

Five years ago, in English and Media classes, we investigated the meaningful integration of technology into lessons and assessments that posed challenging and differentiated outcomes. When a student accidentally exported a keynote slide as an image, we had a thought: we could use this to create digital stories.

 

Keynote allows us to duplicate slides, and it also allows us to alpha key (eliminate) backgrounds of images which often sparks creativity in the minds of students.  From there, we create the first slide.  What we place on the first slide could be duplicated to the second, and with the subtle movement of the image, we could then create an entire animation sequence (click on the model below).

Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 12.53.59 PM

When exporting the slides as images into a folder, the images will export in the same order in which they were created and easily transfer to iMovie (or other movie making software program).  Then, iMovie allows for the alteration of time for each image; when the student changes the duration of each image to .1 seconds, they witness the animation (tip:  vary the time; it does not have to be .1 s).

I teach students this technique to develop digital stories for many reasons.  The skill itself allows students to design, provides them with a tool to showcase their strengths in visual perception, and, most importantly, gives them the capability to use technology meaningfully to transform learning.  Recognizing the potential to use Keynote (or other forms of technology) for something other than simply presenting also promotes invention, and in education I believe it is important to provide a setting where inventing visionaries is a primary objective.

The example given below is from an 11th grade English class.  The student took the first six chapters of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and connected his interpretations of the intentions through a stop-motion digital story.

Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 12.54.21 PM

How can you do this in your class?

Step 1:  Assign the students a reading and allow them to archive, asking them to list the main intentions and ideas.

Step 2:  Ask the students to write a story about the chapters, including both summary, ideas and  intentions.  Tell them to focus on how the plot, characters, and themes develop the ideas and intentions.  I model how to do this, but essentially you want them to tell you a story back; again, summary is fine, but you want to encourage them to transform their notes into an actual story.

Step 3:  Ask the students to highlight key words from the story.  The highlighted words act as markers for them; I tell them that the markers are the slides they want to create, what they want to animate or make come to life.

Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 12.55.37 PM

Step 4:  Open Keynote (or Powerpoint), and begin creating a stop motion animation sequence by developing the first slide, then duplicating and adding or moving items slightly, then duplicating and repeating.  The focus of this assignment is to develop images that go along with the highlighted words.

Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 12.55.52 PM

Step 5:  Create a new folder on your desktop.  Export the slides as jpeg images to that folder.

Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 12.56.07 PM

Step 6:  Open iMovie and import the images (if you are unfamiliar with iMovie, this also works with many other programs. Import images into a new movie).

Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 12.56.28 PM

Step 7:  Alter the duration of the images (this varies for software programs.  In the new version of iMovie it is the speedometer or third tool from the right located in the upper right of your screen)

Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 12.56.41 PM

Step 8:  Voiceover. We used Garageband to record our voiceovers, but some students simply use the voiceover feature in iMovie.  In Garageband, just open new project, vocal, and hit the record button (tip:  turn off the metronome).  In iMovie, find where you want to begin telling the story, and just hit the microphone located beneath the preview window.  The student will adjust the duration of the images while reading the story he/she developed in step 2.

Step 9:  Export the movie.

Tip:  Limit how much control you have over the products; this is their time to take risks with the process. Always show models (use the one on this page to assist) of past student work. Encourage storytelling which can vary from summary to more pure storytelling techniques (adding dialogue for example). Use Google Drive to promote collaboration and to collect the products (movies take up a lot of memory so let Google take care of that for you).  Use Google Classroom assign the presentation and to collect videos as they will all be placed nicely into a folder for you. Develop a rubric that rewards creativity and vision while also assessing core concepts (I have plenty of models).  Have fun and good luck.

Submitted by Kelly Wetherhold, English and Media Teacher at SHS, March 24, 2016

Using Technology to Build Community in Music Class

The month of March is recognized as Music In Our Schools Month across the nation. Students in the Middle School rotate through specialists every 12 weeks so only one third of the student body currently has music class. The Middle School is using Google Apps for Education to include all students and staff in a school-wide celebration of music. Mrs. Mosley created a GoogleSite to be used for information postings and participation in activities. Individuals can post comments on the site to win a daily prize. Our celebration highlights different decades of music and what life was like during those time periods. There are links to collaborative Spotify playlists where participants and can listen to and add music from the featured decade. Weekly trivia games relating to information from the site or posted in the building are shared with all students and staff via the website and Gmail. Pictures from our Decades Dress-Up Days will be posted on the site. The website gives all grade levels, staff, the student newspaper, and our building news station one central location to find out and share music related information for the month.

You can follow along with our celebration as it progresses:   https://sites.google.com/a/salisburysd.org/miosm2016/

Submitted by Rachel Reinecke, Music Teacher and Dept. Chair, March 18, 2016